Reviews


»The P75 f1.9 (type Primoplan) in test«

Today I introduce you to the P75 f1.9 (type Primoplan) from Meyer Optik Görlitz.

I have to admit, it took me some time to get used to this lens, which certainly had something to do with the focal length. Because as a landscape photographer you rarely use a fixed focal length of 75mm. But gradually, this little lens has proven to be more and more useful.

The Meyer-Optik-Goerlitz Primoplan 75 mm / f1.9 is a modern version of the original Primoplan 58 / f1.9 lens, which was developed in 1935 by Meyer-Optik Görlitz designer Paul Schäfter.
The Meyer-Optik-Goerlitz Primoplan 75 mm / f1.9 is a modern version of the original Primoplan 58 / f1.9 lens, which was developed in 1935 by Meyer-Optik Görlitz designer Paul Schäfter.

Primoplan? SEEMS FAMILIAR ...

The Meyer-Optik-Goerlitz Primoplan 75 mm / f1.9 is a modern version of the original Primoplan 58 / f1.9 lens, which was developed in 1935 by Meyer-Optik Görlitz designer Paul Schäfter.

 

The lens comes in a black elegant folding box including lens hood. The Primoplan is excellently processed. The lens housing is made of aluminum with a metal bayonet. The depth of field (aperture) is set on the front ring and it has a scale.

The wider rear ring is the manual focus ring.

 

The Primoplan does not have a stabilizer, which is not absolutely necessary, the short focal length and open aperture to f1.9 make this largely unnecessary.


Chromatic aberration

Chromatic aberrations, usually seen on the high-contrast edges as blue or violet stripes, are well controlled by the lens.

 

Vignette

No appreciable vignetting to recognize.

 

Close focus

The near focus is 0.75 m


THE Bokeh LENS

The term bokeh (written by jap. 暈 け, also ぼ け or ボ ケ, boke "out of focus, blurry") describes in photography a deliberately designed blur area. This design tool is very often used to direct the viewer's attention to the main subject in the foreground. A bokeh can be e.g. smooth, creamy or rough.

 

Typical for many bokehs are the characteristic blurring circles created by a light source in the background, as you can see in the example pictures.

 

The Primoplan impresses with its circular and very clear bokeh.

 

A 14-bladed rounded diaphragm achieves an almost circular aperture even when the shutter is closed. What leads to an excellent bokeh, which is creamy soft.


»Technical data«

Light intensity: f1.9-16

Diaphragm blades: 14, steel, special anti reflex coating

Optical design: 5 elements in 4 group

Lenses: Schott Glas, O’Hara anti reflex coating

Format: 24 x 36 mm (Compatible with fullframe cameras and APSC)

Filter thread: 52 mm

Focal length: 75 mm

Closest focusing distance: 75 cm

Angle of view: +/- 16°

Focus: Manuell

Width: Ø 58 mm /  Length: 55mm

Weight: approx. 300g

 

Available mounts: Canon EF, Nikon F, Sony E, Fuji X, Micro Four Thirds (MFT), M42, Leica M (Finder pairing not supported / Focusing via Live View)
Available mounts: Canon EF, Nikon F, Sony E, Fuji X, Micro Four Thirds (MFT), M42, Leica M (Finder pairing not supported / Focusing via Live View)

»The Primoplan 75mm f1.9 in action«

With the super-soft and creamy bokeh, it is a pleasure to use this lens for detail shots or product shots. Here are my results with the Primoplan:

En route with the Primoplan 75 mm in Ireland.
En route with the Primoplan 75 mm in Ireland.
Frosty detail shots from Iceland ... in terms of sharpness, the Primoplan convinced me too!
Frosty detail shots from Iceland ... in terms of sharpness, the Primoplan convinced me too!

At other shootings, like here at live-cooking, it's really fun to use the lens. The bokeh is just beautiful to look at!
At other shootings, like here at live-cooking, it's really fun to use the lens. The bokeh is just beautiful to look at!
The Primoplan is perfectly suited for putting products in scene.
The Primoplan is perfectly suited for putting products in scene.

»Conclusion«

The Primoplan 75mm f1.9 is a lens I would recommend to any photographer who likes to work with the stylistic bokeh. For me, a manual lens took some getting used to. In landscape photography, I am used to focusing by hand, but there the camera stands comfortably on a tripod and I take pictures on live view. When shooting pictures that I photographed freehand (for example, with the Canon 50mm), I usually used the autofocus. After some time you get used to the manual focusing and I personally take more time with the search and the image.

 

The fact that the 75mm Primoplan is a true lightweight and has a compact shape, has made it my favorite travel companion. The lenses that I mainly use for my landscape shots are quite heavy, which is why I liked to leave my camera in my backpack during hikes or other activities. But the small Primoplan with my Canon 6D I wear at such events now ready by default on the camera strap around the neck. Because there are always motives on my ways that are worth catching.

I'm really looking forward to the future results. The Primoplan 75mm f1.9 will accompany me on a 27-day trip to the islands of Hawaii. I will show you the results during my journey on my social media pages.

 

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